Designing Personal Visualizations for Different People: Lessons from a Study with Elite Soccer Teens

Abstract

This paper describes a study that sought to understand elite soccer teenagers’ use of information visualizations to learn about their own sports performance, how this might motivate them to change behavior, and thus potentially improve their own performance. We specifically investigate how information visualizations support the players’ data comprehension, and how their level of comprehension might depend on factors such as their general literacy, visualization literacy and maturity. We show unsurprisingly that elite soccer teenagers are able to use information visualizations to gain new information about their performance. Based on our investigation, we define a classification of the level of data comprehension. Secondly, we demonstrate a method which allows visualization researchers and practitioners to design and evaluate visualization concepts based on real data over a short time-span. Finally, we argue that designers of personal information visualizations need to consider the range of visualization literacies that are to be expected in many target populations. Our lessons provide new insights in peoples’ use of visualizations and more broadly in visualization literacy. From these insights, we discuss implications for design of visualizations that consider peoples’ level of visualization literacy.

Citation

Thor Herdal, Jeppe Gerner Pedersen, Søren Knudsen. Designing Personal Visualizations for Different People: Lessons from a Study with Elite Soccer Teens. In Personal Visualization: Exploring Data in Everyday Life workshop (IEEEVIS). 2015.

Paper